Month: October 2020

RESULTS: TLA Landlord Energy & Boiler Survey Q3, 2020 (TLALEBS)

RESULTS: TLA Landlord Energy & Boiler Survey Q3, 2020 (TLALEBS)

TLA.co.uk landlords have reported a 58% increase in home energy usage by their tenants as well as significant increases in the levels of repairs and replacements for boilers. Energy usage is up as tenants locate at home during lockdown measures.

The COVID-19 pandemic is having a clear knock-on effect is that people are using more energy and at home.

Middle of the day energy usage is currently up 61% as a result of tenants basing themselves at home during the evolving pandemic places more regions into lockdown measures.

Gas and Boiler Issues in let property

  • Landlords reported a rise (19%) during Q3, 2020 in boiler repairs with 24% of property requiring a repair on a gas boiler within their let properties. Furthermore, an increase from 4%  to 11% compared with Q3 of 2019 required a replacement gas boiler during Q3 of 2020.

Types of Gas Boiler by replacement type

  • Types of gas boilers by replacement type
    • Combi – 61%
    • Regular – 20%
    • System – 19%

By regional breakdown

  • The most boiler repairs were needed in London with 10.08% of boilers estimated to have broken down during this period. This was closely followed by the West Midlands at 8.04% and the North West at 8.59%.
  • Boilers are least likely to break down in South West with 5.80%, Scotland at 5.76% and the North East at 5.55%.
  • These results, at an average of 7.1% nationally, suggests 40,000+ boiler repairs were undertaken on property within portlofios managed by landlords under the guidance of The Landlord Association

 

 

TLA Landlord Survey Q2, 2020 (TLALS)

TLA Landlord Survey Q2, 2020 (TLALS)

Introduction and main findings The 2019-20 TLA Landlord Survey (TLALS) is a survey of landlords and letting agents who own ...
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Landlord Covid-19 Survey – (TLALCV19)

Landlord Covid-19 Survey – (TLALCV19)

1 Question > Thousands Of Votes Collated Already (07/11/20) ...
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General Landlord Survey Q4 2020

General Landlord Survey Q4 2020

This Survey Takes <2 Mins With 6 Questions. Results Will Be Published On 18th November 2020 ...
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RESULTS: TLA Landlord Energy & Boiler Survey Q3, 2020 (TLALEBS)

RESULTS: TLA Landlord Energy & Boiler Survey Q3, 2020 (TLALEBS)

TLA.co.uk landlords have reported a 58% increase in home energy usage by their tenants as well as significant increases in ...
Read More
RESULTS: Latest Rental Yield Hotspot Survey 2021 (TLA-RYHS2021)

RESULTS: Latest Rental Yield Hotspot Survey 2021 (TLA-RYHS2021)

TLA Data Survey Of TLA Members From 05th October 2020 - 04th November 2020. Participants: 12,278 With 55,711 Property(s) > ...
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Covid-19 & Pre-Tenancy Care

Covid-19 & Pre-Tenancy Care

Making sure the check-in process for tenants is carried out in a smooth manner is more important than ever, in light of the coronavirus pandemic.

Restrictions are tightening across the country again as Britain prepares itself for a fully fledged second wave, and while a second national lockdown seems unlikely, there could be further curbs on everyday freedoms as the weather worsens and the annual flu season begins to rear its head.

But what can you do to ensure the pre-tenancy process is as seamless as possible? Here, we outline some top tips for agents eager to impress clients more than ever this winter.

Communicate effectively

During normal times, good communication is vital when it comes to ensuring a smooth, successful tenancy, but this even more so the case at present, when many people are uncertain and confused about what they can and can’t do.

From viewing protocols to playing by the rules on in-branch appointments, to ensuring all your landlords and tenants know where they stand with regards to tenancy agreements, inventories, fees and Energy Performance Certificates (EPCs), it’s vital that communication is clear and consistent throughout.

Make sure you know the preferred method of communication for your landlords and would-be tenants, so you can contact them via a medium which they are likely to check on a regular basis and respond to. For many, this will still be a call, text or email, but for an increasing number it might be via WhatsApp, Facebook Messenger, FaceTime or other social media platforms.

Emphasise the importance of the tenancy agreement

This is the contract signed between your landlords and tenants, setting out the legal terms and conditions of a tenancy and the rules and regulations tenants must abide by – for example, whether they can have a pet, redecorate or smoke indoors. The tenancy agreement can be written down or be a spoken oral agreement. It is, though, far more preferable for it to be written down somewhere, so there is an evidence trail to follow should any disputes occur at a later date. Tenancy Agreements provided by TLA.co.uk – Visit the Landlord InterACTIVE™ service on the homepage.

The tenancy agreement is something tenants should read carefully before they commit to renting a home, to limit the chances of any issues further down the line. If, for example, a landlord has made it explicitly clear that sub-letting is not allowed and late-night parties are a breach of the tenancy agreement, and a tenant goes ahead and does this anyway, the potential for serious disputes goes up.

Tenancy documents – such as tenancy contracts and tenancy agreements – can be signed electronically with digital or e-signatures holding the same weight as physical ones. In these Covid times, where face-to-face interaction is advised against, and remote solutions are being encouraged, you may want to arrange for landlords and tenants to sign in this manner, as well as prioritising digital deposit registration, digital offers and digital referencing.

Make it digital

In days gone by, tenants would likely have come into the office to complete the application process for a new home and sign their tenancy agreement – as well as potentially stopping by for keys and any other queries.

Even before Covid, the trend for people visiting agent branches in-person had been on the decline, but this has been supercharged by the pandemic, with the government actively encouraging appointment-only visits to branches and pushing for remote solutions wherever possible.

This includes remote viewings in the first instance, to ensure that a tenant is serious about a property before visiting it in person.

On the viewing itself, there are a wide range of protocols that all parties – agent, landlord and tenant – must abide by, from face coverings and social distancing to a limit on the number of people in a property at any one time and no mixing of households.  

If something can be managed digitally at present, this is preferable given the restrictions at play – which are also much stricter in certain parts of the country deemed more at risk of virus spread.

Some of the tenancy process was slowly moving online even before January this year, but the desire for digital solutions – streamlined, simplified and highly effective – has gone up a couple of notches since Covid-19 became a part of our lives.

Too much of the current process is bogged down with paperwork and inefficient systems, but agents using fast, streamlined systems can really stand out from the crowd.

Tenancy admin, and the tenant referencing process, can be cumbersome and time-consuming if you don’t have the right kind of procedures in place to speed these up. Again, this is where digital solutions come into their own.

Know the Covid rules

To ensure a smooth pre-tenancy process, it’s vital that letting agents and landlords adhere to the guidance given by government on how to safely let property during the coronavirus pandemic.

Landlords and letting agents should not conduct viewings in properties where tenants are symptomatic or self-isolating, while any visits to a property must be made in accordance with the government’s guidelines on working in other people’s homes and social distancing.

The government also advises letting agents and landlords to take steps to ensure any properties are ready for new tenants, including cleaning to minimise any potential spread of the virus in line with government advice.

Additionally, it’s recommended that letting agents and landlords consider how best to conduct tenancy check-ins for new tenancies, ‘taking care to follow government advice on social distancing and public health advice’ to minimise the spread of infection. Right to Rent checks can, at present, be conducted remotely due to Covid-19.

The government also suggests that agents and landlords look for ways to ensure that in-person payments, referencing or checks can be conducted remotely instead, taking further legal or professional advice if required to implement these properly.

We know that effortless rental transactions are more crucial than ever at present, and here at Propoly we are doing our bit to make that a reality.

We help your landlords and tenants to get to the move-in-date faster by inviting tenants to submit digital offers, pay holding fees, sign ASTs and pay move-in monies all online with minimal manual effort from your side. You can also generate a deal on behalf of landlords by using details provided by tenants digitally, and generate the tenancy agreement instantly by selecting custom options.

Our software also automatically provides your landlords and tenants with instant updates on every step of the process, from viewing feedback, tenancy documents and status updates throughout the tenancy progression process for landlords, while tenants can see status updates for themselves and co-tenants, and complete their references, signing and paying monies online.

General Landlord Survey Q4 2020

General Landlord Survey Q4 2020

This Survey Takes <2 Mins With 6 Questions. Results Will Be Published On 18th November 2020.

One-Click-Away-Solutions™

OCAS™ is a new service from The Landlord Association. TLA members can access a range of services and solutions from the comfort of the new homepage with one click, off-screen solutions:

  • Contact & Live Chat with key suppliers and TLA partners
  • Access services and solutions directly from the new TLA homepage
  • Interact with other landlords live on-screen
  • No need to visit multiple sites – get everything you need from the convenience of a single screen of information with Landlord InterACTIVE.
  • One-Click-Away Solutions™ will evolve into an even more dynamic dashboard with further updates in the making to improve user experience

If you wish to contact us regarding One-Click-Away Solutions™ or Landlord InterACTIVE, please email tla@thelandlordassociation.co.uk.

Section 21 Notice,

Under the Housing Act 1988, a landlord who has granted an assured shorthold tenancy has a legal right to get his property back at the end of the tenancy.

Under the Housing Act 1988, a landlord who has granted an assured shorthold tenancy has a legal right to get his property back at the end of the tenancy. In order to invoke this right, he is required to follow the correct legal procedure which includes service of a notice (under section 21 of the Housing Act 1988) on his tenant. Section 21 is divided into subsections with different rules applying to notice served during the fixed term of a tenancy and notice for possession that is served during a statutory periodic tenancy.

Tenancy Agreement, Scotland

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The tenancy agreement is a contract between you and your landlord. It may be written or oral.The tenancy agreement gives certain rights to both you and your landlord, for example, your right to occupy the accommodation and the your landlord’s right to receive rent for letting the accommodation.

The tenancy agreement is a contract between you and your landlord. It may be written or oral.The tenancy agreement gives certain rights to both you and your landlord, for example, your right to occupy the accommodation and the your landlord’s right to receive rent for letting the accommodation. You and your landlord may have made arrangements about the tenancy, and these will be part of the tenancy agreement as long as they do not conflict with law. Both you and your landlord have rights and responsibilities given by law. The tenancy agreement can give both you and your landlord more than your statutory rights, but cannot give you less than your statutory rights. If a term in the tenancy agreement gives either you or your landlord less than your statutory rights, that term cannot be enforced. A tenancy agreement can be made up of:-

  1. ‘implied terms’. These are rights given by law or arrangements established by custom and practice
  2. ‘express terms’. These include what is in the written tenancy agreement, if there is one, in the rent book, and/or what was agreed orally

Assured Shorthold Tenancy Agreement, England UK

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This is a free tenancy agreement for a landlord letting a property in England. Click the ‘download now’ button below to begin.

This tenancy agreement will be updated December 2020 with an online document creator coming early 2021.

The tenancy agreement is a contract between you and your landlord. It may be written or oral.  The tenancy agreement gives certain rights to both you and your landlord, for example, your right to occupy the accommodation and the your landlord’s right to receive rent for letting the accommodation.

The tenancy agreement is a contract between you and your landlord. It may be written or oral.The tenancy agreement gives certain rights to both you and your landlord, for example, your right to occupy the accommodation and the your landlord’s right to receive rent for letting the accommodation.

You and your landlord may have made arrangements about the tenancy, and these will be part of the tenancy agreement as long as they do not conflict with law. Both you and your landlord have rights and responsibilities given by law. The tenancy agreement can give both you and your landlord more than your statutory rights, but cannot give you less than your statutory rights.

If a term in the tenancy agreement gives either you or your landlord less than your statutory rights, that term cannot be enforced. A tenancy agreement can be made up of:-

  1. ‘implied terms’. These are rights given by law or arrangements established by custom and practice
  2. ‘express terms’. These include what is in the written tenancy agreement, if there is one, in the rent book, and/or what was agreed orally
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SEPTEMBER: Coronavirus Act 2020 (Residential Tenancies: Protection from Eviction)

SEPTEMBER: Coronavirus Act 2020 (Residential Tenancies: Protection from Eviction)

The Coronavirus Act 2020 (Residential Tenancies: Protection from Eviction) (Amendment) (England) Regulations 2020 was laid on 28 August 2020 and came into force on 29 August 2020

The regulations amend Schedule 29 of the Coronavirus Act 2020 to require residential landlords to give tenants 6 months’ notice of their intention to seek possession, except in the most serious cases. These regulations will only apply in England.

The department wrote to chief executives of local authorities, chief housing officers and chief officers of children’s services in England about the amending regulations on 7 September 2020.

Landlord Covid-19 Survey – (TLALCV19)

Landlord Covid-19 Survey – (TLALCV19)

1 Question > Thousands Of Votes Collated Already (07/11/20)

Are You Up To Date With Covid-19 Regulations That Directly Affect Landlords?
Only registered users can vote. Login to vote.

TLA Research and Development
Results For This Survey Will Be Published Shortly

Understanding Your Gas Safety Duties (pt. I)

Understanding Your Gas Safety Duties (pt. I)

Staying on top of the gas safety in a property you’re renting out may seem like extra hassle but as a landlord you have a number of responsibilities to take into consideration. Cutting corners on gas safety in your properties can have serious impacts, so it pays to understand what your obligations are.

The following is intended for Landlords of properties.

We are keen to highlight that, as set out below,  Landlords are responsible for their properties and have a duty of care to their tenants. This means that Registered Gas Engineers are not responsible for Landlords Gas Safety Checks being in place or up to date.

Coronavirus (COVID-19): Advice for landlords ​

The HSE have provided specific guidance for landlords, to help them with understanding their responsibilities during the pandemic. https://www.gassaferegister.co.uk/help-and-advice/covid-19-advice-and-guidance/landlords/.

What are your landlord responsibilities for gas safety?

The Gas Safety (Installation and Use) Regulations 1998 outline your duties as a landlord to make sure all gas appliances, fittings, chimneys and flues are safe and working efficiently. If you’re letting a property with gas appliances installed, you’ve got three main legal responsibilities:

1. Gas safety checks

To ensure your tenants’ safety, all gas appliances and flues need to undergo an annual gas safety check – and always by a Gas Safe registered engineer. Once this has been done, you’ll be given a Landlord Gas Safety Record or Gas Safety certificate with details of all the checks that were carried out. It can also be referred to as a CP12 certificate.

You can arrange for a gas safety check to be carried out any time from 10-12 months after the last check, without affecting the original check expiry date. If it’s less than 10 or more than 12 months after the last check, you’ll end up with a new deadline date – 12 months from the most recent check.

Appliances owned by your tenants aren’t your responsibility – although it’s still up to you to ensure the safety of any connecting flues, unless they’re solely connected to the tenants’ appliance.

2. Gas Safety Record

Following the annual gas safety check and receipt of your Landlord Gas Safety Record, you’ll need to provide a record of this check to your tenants. By law, a copy of your Landlord Gas Safety Record should be given to your current tenants within 28 days of the gas safety check – and for new tenants, you’ll need to provide this at the start of their tenancy.

For rental periods of less than 28 days, just make sure you’ve clearly displayed a copy of your record within the property. You’ll need to keep copies of this gas safety check record until a further two checks have been carried out..

3. Maintenance

You’ll need to make sure that all gas pipework, appliances, chimneys and flues are kept in safe condition. Check the gas appliances’ manufacturer guidelines to find out how often a service is recommended. If you haven’t got access to these, we’d recommend an annual service – unless your Gas Safe registered engineer suggests otherwise.

Installation pipework isn’t covered by the annual gas safety check, but both we and the HSE recommend that when you request a safety check, you ask your Gas Safe registered engineer to:

  • Test for tightness on the whole gas system, including installation pipework
  • Visually examine the pipework (so far as is reasonably practicable)

There are no formal requirements for you to keep maintenance records, but you’ll need to be able to show that you have regularly maintained the pipework, appliances and flues and completed required repairs.

How much does a Landlord Gas Safety check cost?

The cost of your Landlord Gas Safety check will depend on the Gas Safe registered business who carries out your annual gas safety check. We recommend getting at least three quotes from companies before arranging for the check to be carried out. You can find a registered business in your local area on our Check The Register page. 

Additional information

It’s always a good idea to ensure your tenants know where and how to turn the gas off and what to do in the event of a gas emergency.

In Scotland, a private landlord must provide a carbon monoxide (CO) detector where there is fixed combustion appliance, but this does not apply to appliances solely used for cooking.  In Northern Ireland, a CO detector is required when a new or replacement combustion appliance is installed.

Last but not least, make sure it’s always a Gas Safe registered and qualified engineer that’s carrying out gas work or a gas safety check. Landlords are legally required to make sure this is the case – and it’s the most important step to ensuring your tenants’ safety.

Any issues?

We understand that some relationships between landlords and tenants can become problematic. The tenancy agreement should allow access for maintenance or safety checks, but if your tenant refuses to grant access you must show you’ve taken all ‘reasonable steps’ to comply with the law. This includes repeating attempts to carry out the checks and writing to the tenant to explaining that safety checks are a legal requirement in place for their own safety. Keep a record of any action you take; you may need this at a later date.

The Gas Safety (Installation and Use) Regulations don’t give powers to ‘force disconnection’ of the gas supply in these circumstances and you may need to seek legal advice.

Tenant Fees Act

Tenant Fees Act

Documents related to the Tenant Fees Act, which sets out the government’s approach to banning letting fees paid by tenants in the private rented sector.

The Tenant Fees Act bans most letting fees and caps tenancy deposits paid by tenants in the private rented sector in England.

The ban on tenant fees applies to new or renewed tenancy agreements signed on or after 1 June 2019.

The government guidance on the Act for tenants, landlords and letting agents helps explain how this legislation affects them. You might also find the ‘How to Rent’ and ‘How to Let’ guides useful.

The aim of the Act is to reduce the costs that tenants can face at the outset, and throughout, a tenancy. Tenants will be able to see, at a glance, what a given property will cost them in the advertised rent with no hidden costs.

The party that contracts the service – the landlord – will be responsible for paying for that service, helping ensure the fees charged reflect the real economic value of the services provided and sharpen letting agents’ incentive to compete for landlords’ business.

Local enforcement authorities have primary responsibility for enforcing this legislation. The Tenant Fees Act created an independent lead enforcement authority to provide advice and information to local authorities on the Act. Bristol city council has been appointed as the lead enforcement authority for lettings.

From 1 June 2019, the only payments that landlords or letting agents can charge to tenants in relation to new contracts are:

  • rent
  • a refundable tenancy deposit capped at no more than 5 weeks’ rent where the total annual rent is less than £50,000, or 6 weeks’ rent where the total annual rent is £50,000 or above
  • a refundable holding deposit (to reserve a property) capped at no more than 1 week’s rent
  • payments associated with early termination of the tenancy, when requested by the tenant
  • payments capped at £50 (or reasonably incurred costs, if higher) for the variation, assignment or novation of a tenancy
  • payments in respect of utilities, communication services, TV licence and Council Tax
  • a default fee for late payment of rent and replacement of a lost key/security device giving access to the housing, where required under a tenancy agreement

Tenant Fees Act Guidance

What Is Landlord Boiler Cover?

What Is Landlord Boiler Cover?

If you’re a landlord and wondering whether you need landlord boiler cover, or if it’s even worth it, we’re here to help make up your mind. Taking out landlord boiler cover is essential to make sure your tenants stay warm and cosy and avoid those unexpected boiler breakdowns. Boiler cover, also known as gas boiler cover or boiler breakdown cover, is a type of insurance that protects your boiler if it were to breakdown or encounter a fault. If something was to go wrong with the boiler, the boiler cover will help cover the costs of engineer call outs and labour, as well as an annual boiler service, which is vital to keep the manufacturer warranty valid and the boiler in full working order.

Do I need landlord boiler cover? Is landlord boiler cover worth it?

As a landlord, it’ll be your responsibility to cover the costs associated with a broken or faulty boiler, as well as arranging for an engineer to sort the issue. Your tenants won’t be able to take out boiler cover themselves or arrange the repair themselves, which is why cover is also important in your absence. With your permission and with cover in place, the tenant may be able to arrange an engineer call out or repair if the boiler was to break down in your absence. If you already have landlord home insurance, you may have boiler cover in place as part of your buildings and contents insurance.

Most modern boilers will come bundled with a manufacturer warranty of up to 10 years depending on the installer. If you’ve chosen an installer that’s approved by the manufacturer, you’re more likely to have your boiler protected by an extended warranty. If you’re looking to install a Vaillant or Worcester Bosch boiler, keep a lookout for Vaillant Advanced and Worcester Accredited Installers to take full advantage of an extended warranty. If the boiler is older than 15 years, you may have to pay more for cover as it’s more likely that the boiler will break down due to its age. Some cover products will also have specific terms around whether they can cover you if the boiler has already broken down.

At this point, you’re probably wondering, what’s the point in landlord boiler cover if I have a manufacturer warranty? Your boiler’s manufacturer warranty shouldn’t be the only thing you rely on if your boiler was to run into a fault or break down. The warranty is only there to cover you if your boiler fails or breaks down within a certain number of years. However, if the fault or breakdown is caused by physical damage or limescale, this may void your warranty. It’s important to double check your manufacturer warranty to double check what is actually covered.

Landlord boiler cover takes the stress out of boiler breakdowns and repairs. You’ll avoid having to pay a large sum of money to repair your boiler, as well as a regular annual service scheduled to keep your manufacturer warranty valid. With the cover you’ll also get access to a helpline, unlimited call outs, and the added bonus of repairs to the boiler’s controls should they develop a fault. With cover, it’s always best to double check you’re getting the best deal possible.

What’s the difference between homeowner boiler cover and landlord boiler cover?

Boiler cover for a homeowner will usually include repairs for both your boiler and controls, an annual boiler service, and several call outs included in the monthly price. The main difference with landlord boiler cover is that you’ll get a Landlord Gas Safety Record, which is a legal document that shows that you have had your gas appliances checked annually.

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CP12’s & Gas Safety Regulations

CP12’s & Gas Safety Regulations

What are your landlord responsibilities for gas safety?

The Gas Safety (Installation and Use) Regulations 1998 outline your duties as a landlord to make sure all gas appliances, fittings, chimneys and flues are safe and working efficiently. If you’re letting a property with gas appliances installed, you’ve got three main legal responsibilities:

1. Gas safety checks

To ensure your tenants’ safety, all gas appliances and flues need to undergo an annual gas safety check – and always by a Gas Safe registered engineer. Once this has been done, you’ll be given a Landlord Gas Safety Record or Gas Safety certificate with details of all the checks that were carried out. It can also be referred to as a CP12 certificate.

You can arrange for a gas safety check to be carried out any time from 10-12 months after the last check, without affecting the original check expiry date. If it’s less than 10 or more than 12 months after the last check, you’ll end up with a new deadline date – 12 months from the most recent check.

Appliances owned by your tenants aren’t your responsibility – although it’s still up to you to ensure the safety of any connecting flues, unless they’re solely connected to the tenants’ appliance.

2. Gas Safety Record

Following the annual gas safety check and receipt of your Landlord Gas Safety Record, you’ll need to provide a record of this check to your tenants. By law, a copy of your Landlord Gas Safety Record should be given to your current tenants within 28 days of the gas safety check – and for new tenants, you’ll need to provide this at the start of their tenancy.

For rental periods of less than 28 days, just make sure you’ve clearly displayed a copy of your record within the property. You’ll need to keep copies of this gas safety check record until a further two checks have been carried out..

3. Maintenance

You’ll need to make sure that all gas pipework, appliances, chimneys and flues are kept in safe condition. Check the gas appliances’ manufacturer guidelines to find out how often a service is recommended. If you haven’t got access to these, we’d recommend an annual service – unless your Gas Safe registered engineer suggests otherwise.

Installation pipework isn’t covered by the annual gas safety check, but both we and the HSE recommend that when you request a safety check, you ask your Gas Safe registered engineer to:

  • Test for tightness on the whole gas system, including installation pipework
  • Visually examine the pipework (so far as is reasonably practicable)

There are no formal requirements for you to keep maintenance records, but you’ll need to be able to show that you have regularly maintained the pipework, appliances and flues and completed required repairs.

How much does a Landlord Gas Safety check cost?

The cost of your Landlord Gas Safety check will depend on the Gas Safe registered business who carries out your annual gas safety check. We recommend getting at least three quotes from companies before arranging for the check to be carried out. You can find a registered business in your local area on our Check The Register page. 

Additional information

It’s always a good idea to ensure your tenants know where and how to turn the gas off and what to do in the event of a gas emergency.

In Scotland, a private landlord must provide a carbon monoxide (CO) detector where there is fixed combustion appliance, but this does not apply to appliances solely used for cooking.  In Northern Ireland, a CO detector is required when a new or replacement combustion appliance is installed.

Last but not least, make sure it’s always a Gas Safe registered and qualified engineer that’s carrying out gas work or a gas safety check. Landlords are legally required to make sure this is the case – and it’s the most important step to ensuring your tenants’ safety.

Any issues?

We understand that some relationships between landlords and tenants can become problematic. The tenancy agreement should allow access for maintenance or safety checks, but if your tenant refuses to grant access you must show you’ve taken all ‘reasonable steps’ to comply with the law. This includes repeating attempts to carry out the checks and writing to the tenant to explaining that safety checks are a legal requirement in place for their own safety. Keep a record of any action you take; you may need this at a later date.

The Gas Safety (Installation and Use) Regulations don’t give powers to ‘force disconnection’ of the gas supply in these circumstances and you may need to seek legal advice.